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Constriction Band Syndrome's clinical signs and symptoms

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Published By:
Peeyush Ghalot
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Published On:
17-08-2022
(Image Courtesy: - Washington University)

The appearance of constriction band syndrome (CBS), a congenital limb abnormality, varies. By examining a large patient cohort, we aimed to describe the clinical symptoms of CBS. Evaluate potential CBS risk factors was our secondary goal. All patients with CBS who had visited our tertiary medical centre between 1998 and 2018 had their records retrospectively evaluated. Pathognomonic characteristics and examination by a paediatric orthopaedic surgeon were prerequisites for inclusion. To ascertain the pattern of limb involvement and related conditions, clinical notes, images, and radiographs were examined. Population averages were matched with demographic data to identify potential risk variables. One hundred twenty-eight kids were a part of it. Constriction bands (96% of the features) were the most common, followed by limb or digit amputations (88%) and syndactyly/acrosyndactyly (69%). Children without constriction bands typically had acrosyndactyly or a congenital diaphyseal limb or digit amputation that had resulted in the formation of an osseous spike. The thumb/great toe and tiny finger/toe were frequently spared, with a strong preference for the center digits of the hands and feet. Each infant had an average of 2.6 affected limbs, with only 1 involved in 23% of the cases. The number of limbs affected by CBS was higher in children with at least one additional diagnosis (2 limbs [interquartile range (IQR), 1-3 limbs] versus 3 limbs [IQR, 2-4 limbs]; p = 0.006], indicating a more severe phenotype. Children who had more affected limbs underwent more surgeries (p 0.001). Prematurity, low birth weight, young and old maternal age, and greater social deprivation were all linked to CBS. Each infant had an average of 2.6 affected limbs, with only 1 involved in 23% of the cases. The number of limbs affected by CBS was higher in children with at least one additional diagnosis (2 limbs [interquartile range (IQR), 1-3 limbs] versus 3 limbs [IQR, 2-4 limbs]; p = 0.006], indicating a more severe phenotype. Children who had more affected limbs underwent more surgeries (p 0.001). Prematurity, low birth weight, young and old maternal age, and greater social deprivation were all linked to CBS.

Reference: - https://journals.lww.com/jbjsjournal/Abstract/2022/07200/Clinical_Manifestations_of_Constriction_Band.10.aspx